Principles of Australian Constitutional Law, 5th edition (eBook)

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A clear and succinct introduction to constitutional law in Australia.

eBook
AUD$ 121.79
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ISBN/ISSN: 9780409341966

Product description

Principles of Australian Constitutional Law, now in its fifth edition, is a popular textbook aimed at students and practitioners that is now prescribed or recommended in many Australian law schools. It provides helpful summaries of the key cases and an analysis that helps readers to understand contemporary Australian constitutionalism.

Features

  • Concise but comprehensive overview
  • Examines the underlying principles that inform this area of law
  • Included the Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Act and the Australia Act
  • Lecturers have access to a suite of online ancillary on constitutional law

Related Titles

Price, LexisNexis Case Summaries — Constitutional Law, 6th ed, 2016
Siow, Constitutional Law at a Glance, 2015
Trone, Quick Reference Card — Constitutional Law, 2015

 

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Table of contents


  1. Fundamentals

  2. Constitutional Method

  3. Introduction to Australian Federalism

  4. The States

  5. The Territories

  6. Trade, Commerce and Intercourse

  7. Taxation

  8. Corporations

  9. The Races Power

  10. External Affairs

  11. Acquisition of Property on Just Terms

  12. Conciliation and Arbitration

  13. The Federal Executive Power

  14. Finance

  15. Trial by Jury

  16. Freedom of Religion

  17. Discrimination on the Grounds of State Residence

  18. Freedom of Political Communication

  19. Judicial Power

  20. The Constitutional Jurisdiction of the High Court

  21. Inconsistency of Laws